10 Things I Think I Think

Peter King is easily one of my favorite sports writers. His Monday Morning Quarterback column is simply some of the best writing out there. Perhaps the best part of his column is a section called 10 Things I Think I Think.

He’s been on vacation the past few weeks, leaving Monday Morning Quarterback in the hands of guest writers. They’ve all taken their crack at filling the void, but none have really nailed it.

With that in mind, I got the inspiration earlier this week to write my own 10 Things I Think I Think column. So hear it goes…

  1. I think I’m ok with TechCrunch posting all the “secret” and “confidential” documents. TechCrunch is only slightly above the National Enquirer, so it’s not like they have journalistic integrity. Their decision to post didn’t surprise me and the voyeur in me was fascinated to see the inner workings of a company clearly struggling with their own success.  I also think it was nice to see the folks at twitter realize they weren’t gods.  Sometimes you just need to be knocked down a peg or two.
  2. I think Google is the ultimate frenemy. You need them to succeed, but you clearly don’t trust them. I think this distrust of Google is exactly why twitter decided to partner with Microsoft to create Bing Tweets even though Google would have given them even more exposure.
  3. I think I’m just not all that interested with Posterous.  It could just be that I’m stubborn, but I don’t see the value in the platform over what WordPress, tumblr, etc. already offer.
  4. I think the best aspect of the social web is that it’s helped me meet new people in person. Through twitter alone, I’ve made 6 new “real” connections. These are people that I now call upon for advice or just to talk shop. That’s the real power of social media. It’s not the technology and the platforms; it’s the people.
  5. I think in the next 3 years, we’re going to see a quantum shift in the cell phone business. Consumers will be able to buy their phone and then be able to use it with any service provider they choose. This will change the face of mobile in the United States and force service providers to rethink their business model.
  6. I think expectations are a good thing, but ridiculous expectations are completely silly.
  7. I think the term “partnership” is overused and generally misunderstood. True partnership means more than 1 person/team/company/etc. working together for the greater good. It means give and take is expected. It means you look out not only for your own interests, but also the interests of your partners.
  8. I think the whole green movement is a fad and that when put to a choice between a green product that costs 40% more than a non-green product, the non-green product will always win with consumers. When I was looking at houses in Minnesota, I explored so called green houses. The concept was cool and the payout was supposed to be fantastic because of how energy efficient they were. Sure, they are…but they also cost nearly 60% more than a non-green house and the payback happens after roughly 15 years of being in the house. Not exactly what I’d call an exciting return on investment.
  9. I think as video game systems advance, I’m finding them less exciting. The wii doesn’t do it for me and if Microsoft is serious about the next generation in gaming being a controller free world, I’m done with gaming.
  10. I think I’d rather work with passionate people that want to be better than smart people who are devoid of emotion. It’s not even a question.

I enjoy writing. I enjoy sharing my thoughts. The self publishing capabilities that have launched in the last 3 years have made my life infinitely easier and brought me closer to all of you out there. That’s the beauty of an always on, easily connectable, and simple to use internet. I think I’m really thankful for that.

  • Deanna

    Am I one of the 6?

  • http://twitter.com/shawnthinks Shawn Freeman

    Disagree with “Consumers will be able to buy their phone and then be able to use it with any service provider they choose.”

    OEMs of mobile phones charge carriers a much higher price for handset than carriers charge consumers (subsidy model). Carriers then make up that difference via multi-year contracts. At some point, ppl wil push for freedom, but it will come at an actual price in the cost of handset ($199 v $499 scenario).

    And not to be geeky, but you've also got CDMA vs GSM technology issues across carriers that make single handset/any carrier difficult to execute in us (Europe and Asia are more standardized on GSM).

    FWIW.

  • http://twitter.com/shawnthinks Shawn Freeman

    Disagree with “Consumers will be able to buy their phone and then be able to use it with any service provider they choose.”

    OEMs of mobile phones charge carriers a much higher price for handset than carriers charge consumers (subsidy model). Carriers then make up that difference via multi-year contracts. At some point, ppl wil push for freedom, but it will come at an actual price in the cost of handset ($199 v $499 scenario).

    And not to be geeky, but you've also got CDMA vs GSM technology issues across carriers that make single handset/any carrier difficult to execute in us (Europe and Asia are more standardized on GSM).

    FWIW.

About
Digital dad to Cora and John. Love ironing, bourbon and BBQ; no necessarily in that order. Living life, like I stole it. I'm always up for a

spirited conversation. These are my thoughts and ramblings, not those of my employer.
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